Provincial review of local early years planning seeking input

Tessa Graham, the executive lead of the Provincial Office for the Early Years, will be attending the Wednesday, September 16 First Call Early Childhood Development Roundtable meeting to discuss this review of early years planning in BC. Responses to the review document and the questions in it can also be sent directly to Tessa’s office. If you plan to attend the September meeting, please RSVP to info@firstcallbc.org

From EYCDI E-news:

The Provincial Office for the Early Years is launching a review of early years planning in BC and wants to hear from you. The goal of this review and these consultations is to help inform how the Office could refocus funding for local early years planning on an infrastructure model that will ensure:

  • Key decisions makers are actively engaged
  • Strategic planning is focused on service integration
  • Planning occurs consistently across the province and is grounded in data regarding the community’s identified needs and quality early years and family support practices
  • Funding to support planning is guided by a formal planning and accountability framework

Please read the document, Help Us Plan to Plan: Help Shape the Future of Local Early Years Planning in BC. This document provides context and background to this review and highlights some key questions for consultation. Please share your responses to these questions via email to EarlyYearsOffice@gov.bc.ca

Comments Off on Provincial review of local early years planning seeking input

Filed under Campaigns and Issues, Early Childhood Development

Rally at Vancouver City Hall for the living wage, July 8 – Join us!

Wednesday, July 8, 2015
9-10 am
Vancouver City Hall
12th and Cambie (map)
Find out more
Download the poster

Bring your banners and join Metro Vancouver Alliance and the Living Wage for Families Campaign on the steps of City Hall to show support for Vancouver becoming a living wage city. Bus, Skytrain, cycle or walk!

Why a living wage? Vancouver has the second-highest child-poverty rate among Canada’s 20 largest urban centres. One third of those poor children live in families with at least one adult working full time, all year round. Every member of the community is affected by low-wage poverty.

On July 8 Mayor Robertson will introduce a motion to make Vancouver a living wage city.

Bring your leaders, members, neighbours and friends to rally in support for this vital policy change. Let’s show the mayor and council that the whole community supports the living wage!

Don’t have a banner? Join us for banner painting
Monday, July 6
6:30-8:30 pm
Gordon Neighbourhood House
Contact Deanna info@livingwageforfamilies.ca or 604-975-3347 for details

Comments Off on Rally at Vancouver City Hall for the living wage, July 8 – Join us!

Filed under Call to Action, Living Wage for Families Campaign

Responses to TRC in education from BC Ministry of Education and Aboriginal Relations

B.C. teachers’ professional development day to focus on Aboriginal education

http://www.vancouversun.com/life/devote+teacher+professional+aboriginal+education/11151379/story.html

BC and FNESC sign new agreement on Aboriginal education

https://news.gov.bc.ca/stories/new-protocol-to-strengthen-collaboration-on-aboriginal-education

Funding for residential school awareness project announced

http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/news/local-news/province-funding-education-about-residential-schools-1.1975452

BCTF has been calling for a course on Aboriginal history and culture to be a requirement for all BC students to graduate.

http://bctf.ca/NewsReleases.aspx?id=37525

Comments Off on Responses to TRC in education from BC Ministry of Education and Aboriginal Relations

Filed under Economic Equality, Youth Transitions

Take BCCF’s survey on federal government’s efforts to help families

Do you know whether the Children’s Fitness Tax Credit limit will be raised to $500 or $1,000?

Test your knowledge of the federal government’s new strategies to help families, and share your thoughts by filling out the BC Council for Families’ new survey.

BCCF will share the results with government, policy makers and other non-profit organizations and will post your feedback on their website.

We encourage you to take the survey. The results will help inform First Call’s upcoming Federal Election Toolkit.

Comments Off on Take BCCF’s survey on federal government’s efforts to help families

Filed under Campaigns and Issues, Research

Why do we pay so much for prescription drugs? Take action for national drug coverage

More and more people are calling for national drug coverage, or  pharmacare, including doctors, nurses, economists and people who don’t have drug coverage.

These calls reflect a growing problem that affects everyone in Canada: we are paying too much for prescription drugs. Prescription medications cost on average 30% more in Canada than in other industrialized countries.

First Call has called for a national pharma plan in the Child Poverty Report Card. Take action by signing the petition from the Campaign for National Drug Coverage

Comments Off on Why do we pay so much for prescription drugs? Take action for national drug coverage

Filed under Call to Action, Campaigns and Issues, Economic Equality

Proposed changes to Health Canada nutrition labelling

Earlier this month, Health Canada proposed changes to regulations governing nutrition labelling on pre-packaged foods, the first time since proposing changes in 2001, reports the Centre for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI). The deadline for submitting comments is August 26, 2015.

There is a debate about whether those changes really make food labels easier to understand or useful enough to significantly reduce the 66,000 deaths annually attributed to nutrition-related heart attacks, strokes and diabetes, writes the CSPI. The government plan seems to be aiming for a 1%-3% reduction in diet-related disease, which seems extremely unambitious.

Health Canada is proposing the continued cosmetic use of artificial dyes despite the health risks to children. They propose to maintain 2,300 mg of sodium as a daily value instead of 1,500 mg (as the government’s Sodium Working Group unanimously recommended), which seems inconsistent with Health Canada’s own dietary advice.

Health Canada’s June 2015 technical proposal is available starting at page 1192 at: http://www.canadagazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/2015/2015-06-13/pdf/g1-14924.pdf

CSPI’s media comment is available here: http://cspinet.org/canada/pdf/cspi.nutrition-label.gazette.comment.pdf

Source: CSPI alert

Comments Off on Proposed changes to Health Canada nutrition labelling

Filed under Campaigns and Issues, Safe and Caring Communities

RCY and Provincial Health Officer joint report: Vulnerable children and youth continue to lag behind their peers

June 18, 2015, the Representative for Children and Youth and the Provincial Health Officer released a joint report that examines the question, “How are our children doing right now?”

Growing Up in B.C. – 2015 finds that while there have been some improvements, vulnerable children and youth – especially Aboriginal children and those in government care – continue to lag behind their peers. In addition, it found that with changes to the way governments are collecting data, it’s getting harder to get a clear picture of the well-being of B.C. children and youth.

As a follow-up to the first Growing Up in B.C. issued in 2010, the report documents six areas of child health and well-being, with the voices of experts and youth prominent throughout.

The report can be found at www.rcybc.ca/guibc2015

News coverage:

CTV News: B.C.’s children in care start behind and stay there: children’s representative

24 Hrs: B.C.’s poor kids facing more future challenges: advocate

Vancouver Sun: Daphne Bramham: Charting a blind course to the future

Globe and Mail: Vulnerable BC kids start behind affluent peers and stay there: report

CBC: Lives of BC’s most vulnerable children not improving, says Children’s rep

Comments Off on RCY and Provincial Health Officer joint report: Vulnerable children and youth continue to lag behind their peers

Filed under Research, Youth Transitions